Blog

Fostering an Environment for Breakthrough Thinking

Are you an Artist or an Art Critic?

Q: When did you stop doing the creative things you did when you were a kid?
A: You stopped when you realized that if you never create, you never have to risk being criticized.

We start life as an Artist, constantly creating, but something odd happens as we grow up. Over time, we slowly turn into Art Critics. We don’t intend to do it, but, naturally, we create less and less and spend more time learning how to analyze or critique. Don’t get me wrong.

Learning how to critique can be great because it is a key element to becoming a better creator. But the real problem arises when you criticize something or someone and no longer spend time creating anything yourself.

We don’t intend to do it, but, naturally, we create less and less and spend more time learning how to analyze or critique. Don’t get me wrong. Learning how to critique can be great because it is a key element to becoming a better creator. But the real problem arises when you criticize something or someone and no longer spend time creating anything yourself.

Learning how to critique can be great because it is a key element to becoming a better creator. But the real problem arises when you criticize something or someone and no longer spend time creating anything yourself.

Now, here’s a tough question I want you to answer with regards to your role as a leader of your business, your children and even your own ability to create new ideas. Do you spend more time critiquing the people and the work being done around you, or do you spend more time appreciating, affirming and empowering those around you.

A growing illumination in my work as an artist, as a business strategist and as a father is to grow my role as a creator and a catalyst and lesson my role as a critic. I want to create bold new work as an artist without judging its commercial merit. As a business strategist, I want to foster an environment where bold new ideas are welcomed without critique or fear of ridicule. As a father, I want to be a source of inspiration.

Artists must live amongst critics and can sometimes give critiques themselves. But what sets a true Artist apart is one simple characteristic: An Artist continues to create. What sets a true leader apart is equally as simple. A leader continues to inspire. And then finally as a father, I want to be my boys biggest fan -- to have the wisdom to stop being a coach or micromanaging critic and start being their cheerleader.

This post was originally published on The Art of Vision.

Return to list

0 Comments

    Leave a Comment